EAL 2.0

from the known to the new

Inspired by a recent email, I'm in a digital frame of mind. My questions for all of you are: do you use portfolios to document student learning? If so, do you use digital portfolios or hard copy or a combination of both? Do you have separate teacher and student portfolios?


http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/reviews/EdPotentialReview.html
http://members.shaw.ca/technology/index.htm
http://eportfolios.wikispaces.com/
http://sites.google.com/site/eportfolios02/

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Wendy,

Self Guided Workshop on Creaing e-Portfolio looks very interesting!
I had some questions but I better go through what you have aboe and ask them.

Thank you!
I haven't used portfolios. But I have just attended a weekend SUNY course on assessment and feedback in which portfolios were discussed.
My last school used e-portfolios for the students in the Primary Years Programme. I don't know how.
In my previous school, all students from MS and HS created an electronic portfolio that highlighted their growth and progress over the year. They had to select at least two artifacts for each class every semester as evidence of their own learning. For each artifact, students had to write a refelction about why they selected this artifact, what they learned, and how they learned. These were used by students in student-led conferences as a discussion point about learning with parents. The portfolios were powerful learning tools that encouraged disucssion and reflection about learning.

My students are using Google sites now for E-portfolios and we are absolutely thrilled with the many features of combining Google apps.

When students revise written work in a Google doc, the teachers can look at the revision history. This tells us so much about how much writing a student is doing in one sitting, the choices that student makes about how and what to revise, and ensures the work is the students and not the parent's or tutor's! The sites are easy to make with templates I create for the pages (Writing, Reading, Notebooks, Goal-setting). The best part is that the students have an immediate audience with peers as they chose the work to share with each other. Next year, we will have friends across the globe to share, peer edit, and collaborate on projects.

As a teacher, I love Google forms for reading and writing surveys and for checklists. The information is collated in a spreadsheet which makes it easy to find the information I need and to spot themes and trends. Finding student writing on Google docs is easy with the search feature and is so much greener that having a pile of writing drafts. I am now the queen of organization!

 

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